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20% off

Morrison celeriac!

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Christmas vegetables

Imagine Christmas without steaming Brussels sprouts, golden carrots and chewy parsnips. It would be unthinkable! For many people, it is the opulent side dishes that make the Christmas meal complete so don’t think of side dishes as add-ons. They deserve as much care and attention as the lead role and you may even discover a new star (celeriac instead of bread sauce anyone?). Read on to discover more…

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Brussels Sprouts

The Marmite of the veg world, whatever you think of these little green niuggets, they are a Christmas tradition. If you’re not a fan of the taste, consider the health benefits – they are packed full of folic acid and contain anti-cancerous properties, although they do contain high levels of suplharane, making them smell like rotten eggs if overcooked! Some of the best ways to enjoy them are finely sliced and stir fried with other strong flavours such as chestnuts, bacon and mushrooms.

Try this:  pan fry halved sprouts in sunflower oil. Halfway through cooking dot with butter so they really caramelise and go crispy. Scatter with sesame seeds, toast a couple more minutes then throw in a handful of pomegranate seeds. Season with salt and pomegranate molasses before serving.

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Chantenay carrots

Everyone loves a pretty carrot and these mini versions are the sweetest of them all. In fact, it’s said they taste like carrots use to taste. This sweetness comes out in the cooking – for a light side dish, simply boil and serve with herb butter or roast them whole, doused in rosemary oil to serve as an elegant side dish with your Sunday roast or for a special occasion like the Christmas lunch. Best of all – they don’t need peeling!

Try this: scrub the carrots then place in a roasting tin and drizzle with olive oil. Scatter with fresh thyme or oregano leaves or rosemary sprigs – whichever you prefer – and drizzle with orange juice. Roast until soft and golden.

Parsnip

 A much-loved root vegetable, parsnips have a subtle earthy flavour that turns sweet and nutty on cooking. The sweetest parsnips are those that are picked after a frost and the fresher the better. To bring out this sweet flavour, try roasting in a little maple syrup, boil with fragrant spices to create a warming soup, or purée with milk and butter for a creamy parsnip mash.

Try this: make oven roasted parsnips extra special for your Christmas lunch by dousing them in olive oil, salt and pepper and roasting for 20 minutes. Drizzle them in maple syrup the return back to the oven for another 15 minutes until they heat up to get that chey centre with crispy exterior.

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Celeriac

Not the prettiest of vegetables, true, but appearances can be deceptive. Beneath the rather gnarly exterior lies a real beauty – creamy white flesh that makes the most divine mash. A descendant of the celery family, celeriac has a slightly nutty flavour that is delicious in winter slaws – a great one to serve with the Boxing Day cold meats!

Try this: make a gluten free version of bread sauce to serve with your turkey using celeriac – it’s a great alternative, trust us! Start by infusing an onion in milk along with a few cloves, a clove of garlic, peppercorns and a couple of bay leaves. Peel and chop the celeriac, place in a pan and pour in the infused milk to cover. Boil until tender then purée with a stick blender. Season to taste.

20% off Morrison celeriac
Valid until 31st December 2023
Taste Club members can enjoy 20% off Morrison celeriac for the month of December. Ideal for perfecting your gluten free bread sauce or for a vibrant winter sale to polish off your leftovers on Boxing Day!